Coronavirus in New York

Navigating the new vaccine mandate

BY Spectrum News NY1

This week, Mayor de Blasio announced a new COVID-19 vaccine mandate for all public employees. NY1’s Zack Fink, Juan Manuel Benítez and Gloria Pazmino weigh in on his decision and the ripple effects it might have on the city.

And with the general election around the corner, they take a closer look at the race for Public Advocate. The Democratic incumbent, Jumaane Williams, is highly favored to win, but he has also publicly said he’s seriously considering a run for governor. So is it wise for New Yorkers to reelect him?

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SoHo folk pharmacy: Not your average mom and pop shop

BY Edric Robinson

It may not be the most conventional venue for the band Sheriff and the Deputy, but lead singer Sheriff Bob says this gem in his SoHo neighborhood means the most.

“This is unique. It’s a drug store and this has become a stage, so if that isn’t about community I don’t know,” Sheriff Bob said.

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Brooklyn elementary school hires COVID-19 testing van

BY Alyssa Paolicelli

Before heading to class Thursday morning, Hudson Williams, his younger brother and his father all received COVID-19 tests at a mobile testing site just up the block from the students' elementary school.

“They are not testing kindergartners right now, and we want to make sure he gets tested," Hudson's father, Roy Williams, explained. "It keeps the community safe. It keeps the school safe."

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Sanitation boss: Department will prepare in case of staff shortages after vaccine mandate

BY Spectrum News Staff

NEW YORK — City union workers are reacting after Mayor Bill de Blasio extended the COVID-19 vaccine mandate to cover all public workers.

In an appearance on “Mornings On 1” on Thursday morning, Sanitation Commissioner Ed Grayson said he thinks the incentive program — offering workers $500 for getting their first dose — will lead to an increase in vaccination numbers, but some of his employees are still hesitant to get the shot.

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Calls grow for city to loosen COVID restrictions on indoor high school sporting events

BY Ron Lee

For 17-year-old Isaiah Wright, years of shooting hoops in the backyard of his Jamaica home has helped him become a star point guard at Cardozo High School. And while Wright dreams of playing college basketball for UCLA, the expense of college is daunting.

“Honestly, it’s really important for me to get a scholarship,” Wright told NY1. “I feel like I want to go to college and chase my dreams for the NBA route.”

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Health care employees rally against COVID vaccine mandate

BY Spectrum News Staff

WORCESTER, Mass. - Health care employees have a vaccine mandate deadline approaching, and some took to the streets to protest it Sunday.

UMass Memorial Health employees are required to receive a COVID-19 vaccine or an exemption by November 1. Right now, people who are unvaccinated are facing potential suspension and termination.

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Looking at an NYC law that requires hotels reopen or pay workers laid off during pandemic

BY Edric Robinson

NEW YORK — Denise Matthew says her desk looks exactly the same as she left it back on March 18, 2020.

“I didn’t really say goodbye. I didn’t clean out my drawer, because I thought it was going to be for a few weeks. And then a few weeks turned into a few days, few months, and then a year and then coworkers started dying,” an emotional Matthew said outside City Hall.

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Changing the business of Fashion Week

BY Debora Fougere

Fashion is big business in New York City. According to the Council of Fashion Designers of America, the industry creates more than $2 billion in tax revenue and employs more than 180,000 New Yorkers, 4.6% of the city's workforce.

Then came COVID-19. Suddenly, the work stopped, the showrooms and the runway shows were shut down, and everyone from models to makeup artists, hair stylists to pattern cutters, were out of work. Eighteen months of solitude gave designers a chance to rethink the way they do business.

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Demand for at-home COVID tests surges as supplies dwindle

BY Stef Manisero

The real estate market is coming off a summer boom, though agents like Matt Lerner is still riding the wave.

“It’s definitely quieter than it was this summer, this summer was insanity,” Lerner said, then adding, “I’ll go out and I’ll do six appointments in a day, I’ll do 20 in a week.”

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Vaccine pop-up sites at movie theaters will offer $100 gift cards

BY Ari Ephraim Feldman

Residents going to movie theaters can now get a vaccine with their popcorn and soda.

The city is opening several vaccine pop-up sites at movie theaters starting this weekend, and offering a $100 gift card to people getting their first shot at the sites.

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'Aladdin' returns to Broadway after COVID-19 outbreak

BY Frank DiLella
UPDATED 10:15 PM ET Oct. 12, 2021

NEW YORK — For those looking to catch the hit musical "Aladdin" on Broadway, your wish is granted!

The Disney musical originally returned to the New Amsterdam Theatre on Sept. 28 for the first time since March 2020, but was shut down the following night due to breakthrough COVID-19 cases in the company.

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Expert sees hope in future of New York commercial real estate

BY Shanel Dawson

NEW YORK — The COVID-19 pandemic has forced many companies to rethink their operations, including the way their employees work. Many corporations have transitioned to a work-from-home model, but, unfortunately, the commercial real estate market has taken a significant hit because of this. And as the delta variant continues to spread, many offices are pushing back the date their employees can return to work, leaving some office buildings and retail spaces vacant or underused.

Scott Rechler, the chairman and CEO of RXR Realty, joined NY1 political anchor Errol Louis on "Inside City Hall" on Friday evening to talk about the future of commercial real estate in New York City. Rechler, who is also the chair of the Regional Plan Association, also discussed the recent report from State Comptroller Tom DiNapoli, which highlights the pandemic's impact on commercial real estate.

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Kyrie Irving could join Nets at practice after NYC ruling

BY Associated Press

NEW YORK (AP) — Kyrie Irving could join the Brooklyn Nets at practice this weekend after a ruling that their practice facility doesn't fall under a New York coronavirus vaccination mandate.

The Nets were told Friday that the training center is considered a private facility. The city's vaccine mandate requires pro athletes practicing or playing in public venues to be vaccinated against COVID-19.

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For this student, the DOE’s COVID-19 vaccine mandate meant losing his paraprofessional

BY Jillian Jorgensen

NEW YORK — Since Monday, Jessica Waverka has had no idea who would replace her son Theo’s longtime paraprofessional, who took leave when the city's COVID-19 vaccine mandate went into effect.

“My son's para is the only reason that he can access the Department of Education school building. She ensures that he's safe, that he doesn't elope, or wander out of the building. She helps him with his emotional regulation when he's in the classroom,” Waverka said. “He has an eating disorder — she helps him make sure that he is intaking enough food and fluids throughout the day. She also helps him with his schoolwork — and enormous support for this child.”

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Recent survey reveals challenges ahead for local eateries

BY Karina Mitchell

A recent survey from the National Restaurant Association reveals the majority of restaurant owners say business conditions are worse now than three months ago.

An increase in restaurant reopenings over the summer has stalled, due in part to the rise in delta variant virus cases across parts of the country. The city has also seen restaurants struggle to overcome the latest blow.

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Former educators protest Department of Education vaccine mandate

BY Rebecca Greenberg

At 66 years old, Bernice Wise was gearing up to retire after one more year of teaching. However, her education career ended earlier than she planned. Without a vaccine, Wise is prohibited from teaching.

“It feels really hurtful not to know if you’re gonna have a roof over your head, if you’re gonna be able to feed your family and yourself,” Wise says. “It feels hurtful to know that you bonded with families and children over the years and we just had to walk out.”

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COVID vaccine mandate for DOE employees in effect

BY Alyssa Paolicelli , Spectrum News Staff and Anna Lucente Sterling
UPDATED 12:31 PM ET Oct. 04, 2021

More than 95% of all full-time city Department of Education employees have been vaccinated against the coronavirus as the department's vaccine mandate took effect Monday, according to Mayor Bill de Blasio.

"As of today, all the employees in our 1,600 schools are vaccinated and that is unprecedented," de Blasio said Monday at a news briefing. "And that's on top of all the layers of protection, all the health and safety measures that make up that gold standard that we put in place last year- that's continued to deepen this year."

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Broadway extends COVID-19 vaccination and mask requirements through end of year

BY Spectrum News Staff

NEW YORK — Broadway is extending its COVID-19 vaccination and mask requirements through the end of the year.

The Broadway League announced Friday that proof of vaccination will continue to be required for all audience members, performers, backstage crew and venue staff. People with medical conditions that prevent them from getting the vaccine can get exemptions.

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Sotomayor denies request from teacher group to block DOE vaccine mandate

BY Justin Izzo and Faraz Toor
UPDATED 9:48 PM ET Oct. 01, 2021

NEW YORK — U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor has denied a request for an injunction against the Department of Education's COVID-19 vaccine mandate, the mayor's press secretary and the attorney who filed the petition confirmed Friday afternoon.

NEWS: Justice Sonia Sotomayor has denied the request for an emergency injunction against @NYCSchools vaccine mandate. We were at 90% employees vaccinated today, will share final numbers Monday!

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'Aladdin' cancels additional performances after more COVID-19 cases

BY Justin Izzo and Associated Press
UPDATED 8:19 PM ET Oct. 01, 2021

NEW YORK — The Broadway show "Aladdin" has canceled performances through Oct. 10 after more breakthrough COVID-19 cases were detected within the company, Disney Theatrical Productions confirmed Friday evening.

Disney says "Aladdin" is scheduled to resume performances on Oct. 12.

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This high school is ready for Monday's mandate — with all staff vaccinated

BY Jillian Jorgensen

At Flushing International High School, Principal Kevin Hesseltine said he’s ready for the vaccine mandate for city school staff to take effect Monday morning.

“I'm really fortunate and very happy. Our staff is 100% vaccinated. So the impact on our school is zero. You know, everyone's gonna be here on Monday, ready to work and teach our students,” he said.

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Teachers petition Supreme Court to stop NYC from enforcing COVID-19 vaccine mandate

BY Faraz Toor
UPDATED 9:00 AM ET Oct. 01, 2021

NEW YORK — A group of New York City teachers has asked the U.S. Supreme Court for an injunction to stop the city from enforcing its COVID-19 vaccine mandate, court records show.

The emergency injunction request was filed Thursday, a day before Department of Education employees must receive at least their first COVID-19 shot to continue working.

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'Aladdin' resumes Broadway performances after one-day COVID-19 hiatus

BY Angi Gonzalez
UPDATED 1:25 AM ET Oct. 01, 2021

NEW YORK — Ticket-holders who were in line for Thursday’s showing of "Aladdin the Musical" at the New Amsterdam Theatre were thrilled to learn the show would go on after Wednesday’s show was abruptly called off.

The production said Thursday there were no new positive tests in the last 24 hours after two rounds of testing.

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Family of transit workers who died from COVID-19 gather for union's new memorial

BY Dan Rivoli

BROOKLYN, N.Y. — Veronica Fletcher was among the dozens of family members who came to the Transport Workers Union hall in downtown Brooklyn on Thursday to honor transit workers who died of COVID-19 and to see the union’s new memorial.

“My late husband, like a true warrior and soldier, went into the trenches he went into the street to make sure people can keep living their lives, keep saving lives, keep taking care of their families, with no regard to his own," Fletcher sad.

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City will tap contact tracers to create permanent health outreach corps

BY Ari Ephraim Feldman

The city is creating a permanent public health outreach network, Mayor Bill de Blasio said Wednesday, drawing on the corps of contact tracers used to track COVID-19 infections around the city.

The new $235 million program is part of an effort first announced a year ago to make the city a center of public health research.

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New art installation honors pandemic's fallen health care workers

BY Lori Chung

Each portrait now on display in the windows of the New York Life building reflects the toll that the ongoing pandemic has had on frontline workers. Each one is a tribute to health care professionals like Dr. Carlos Vallejo, who died from exposure to COVID-19.

"We were telling my dad, ‘Hey, dad, be careful, wear your masks, wear your PPE and everything when you see these patients,’ but that never really stopped my dad. He would still continue to see his COVID patients,” said Charlie Vallejo.

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25% of school safety agents in NYC still aren't vaccinated against COVID-19

BY Jillian Jorgensen

NEW YORK — About a quarter of NYPD school safety agents still have not been vaccinated against the coronavirus — and if that doesn’t change by 5 p.m. this Friday, they won’t be eligible to work next week.

“There's days more for people to get vaccinated,” Mayor Bill de Blasio said at his daily news briefing Tuesday. “We guarantee you a substantial number more will get vaccinated in that time.”

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CDC study: Side effects from 3rd booster dose similar to those from 2nd dose

BY Spectrum News Staff

People who received a third dose of a COVID-19 vaccine experienced side effects after the shot at similar rates to those who received two doses, according to a study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a promising sign about vaccine safety as booster doses roll out nationwide for millions of Americans.

"The frequency and type of side effects were similar to those seen after the second vaccine doses and were mostly mild or moderate and short-lived," CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky said at a White House COVID-19 Response Team briefing on Tuesday.

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Met Opera returns, plays opera composed by an African American for first time

BY Stephanie Simon

NEW YORK — Before the first note, Monday was a night filled with emotion and excitement as fans returned to the Metropolitan Opera after more than 18 months away.

But it was also historic because the opera performed was the first by an African American at the Met Opera in its 138-year history. “Fire Shut Up In My Bones” was composed by jazz musician Terence Blanchard.

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City can move forward with vaccine mandate for educators and staff, judge rules

BY Faraz Toor and Patrick Adcroft
UPDATED 8:48 PM ET Sep. 27, 2021

NEW YORK — New York City can go forward with implementing its COVID-19 vaccine mandate for Department of Education workers, a federal appeals panel ruled Monday afternoon, although the city will not enforce it until the end of the week.

The mandate, which was originally supposed to go into effect Monday, requires all teachers and staff to get at least one dose of the vaccine.

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Federal judge grants temporary injunction on DOE vaccine mandate

BY Spectrum News Staff

NEW YORK — A federal appeals court on Friday granted a temporary injunction blocking the city from enforcing its COVID-19 vaccine mandate deadline Monday for all city public school teachers and staff.

According to the court document, Judge Joseph F. Bianco states the injunction will be in place only until a three-judge panel reviews the appeal from a Brooklyn federal judge's ruling this week that upheld the mandate.

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New Yorkers change how they socialize with rise of delta variant

BY Justine Re

NEW YORK — An Ipsos poll finds 3 in 5 Americans believe returning to their pre-coronavirus life right now would be a risk, the highest level since early March.

That's made some New Yorkers more selective in who they see and where they go with the spread of the delta variant of COVID-19.

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De Blasio dismisses fears of a teacher staffing crunch due to COVID-19 vaccine mandate

BY Dan Rivoli

NEW YORK — Tuesday morning, public schools across the five boroughs will find out how the Department of Education's COVID-19 vaccination mandate for employees will affect staffing levels. Those who aren't vaccinated can't come to work.

"My concern come Tuesday morning is the fact that, I think schools — my school included — we're not quite certain what to anticipate," said Anne Wine, who is also a chapter leader at the United Federation of Teachers (UFT).

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Embattled New York State Health Commissioner Howard Zucker resigns

BY Zack Fink

Once hailed for being part of former Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s elite team holding regular press briefings in the fight against the coronavirus, State Health Commissioner Howard Zucker soon came under fire for the numerous COVID-related deaths inside state licensed nursing homes.

After more than a month of speculation about Zucker’s future, Gov. Kathy Hochul announced that he’s resigning.

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Judge rules city can go forward with DOE vaccine mandate

BY Jillian Jorgensen and Spectrum News Staff
UPDATED 11:15 PM ET Sep. 22, 2021

NEW YORK -- A judge on Wednesday afternoon ruled that the city's requirement that Department of Education employees get the COVID-19 vaccine can move forward for now.

The mandate requires all teachers and staff to get at least one dose of the vaccine by next Monday.

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City issued thousands of warnings since indoor vaccine mandate took effect

BY Victoria Manna
UPDATED 9:18 PM ET Sep. 20, 2021

The city handed out 3,200 warnings last week to businesses that failed to ask patrons to show proof of vaccination, Mayor Bill de Blasio’s office said Monday.

So far, the city says it has issued no fines since it started enforcing a vaccine mandate at certain indoor businesses last week.

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COVID-19 testing to increase in public schools, but fewer students will quarantine

BY Jillian Jorgensen and Ari Ephraim Feldman
UPDATED 4:22 PM ET Sep. 20, 2021

With one school building already closed a week into the academic year, the city will increase coronavirus testing in public schools, but will also require fewer children to quarantine, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced on Monday.

The city will move to weekly testing at all elementary, middle and high schools starting on Sept. 27, the same day a vaccine mandate for adult staff is set to go into effect. The city started off the school year saying they’d test students every two weeks, which many parents and educators deemed insufficient. The city's teachers' union called on Sunday for weekly testing.

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Sara Bareilles returns to Broadway in triumphant reopening of 'Waitress'

BY Frank DiLella

Frank DiLella sits down with singer/songwriter Sara Bareilles to talk about playing the lead role of Jenna and singing her own songs on Broadway once again in "Waitress." We follow Sara and the company as they begin rehearsals, all the way through a celebratory and emotional re-opening night at the Barrymore Theatre.

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'American Utopia' returns for encore engagement on Broadway

BY Frank DiLella

Frank DiLella talks to Rock and Roll Hall of Famer and Talking Heads founder David Byrne about his hit show "American Utopia," which just reopened at the St. James Theatre after a sold-out Broadway run prior to the COVID shutdown.

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New York Philharmonic plays for a full crowd after 556-day ‘intermission’

BY Dan Rivoli

NEW YORK — Frank Huang, the first violinist and concertmaster for the New York Philharmonic, is once again playing before a full crowd, at Alice Tully Hall, after 556 days.

“That kind of feeling, when we walk out and see a full audience, it’s very inspirational to us because we want to share the music with as many people as possible,” Huang said on Friday evening.

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Trio of tourists charged in attack of Carmine's hostess who asked for vaccine proof

BY Edric Robinson and Spectrum News Staff
UPDATED 7:30 PM ET Sep. 17, 2021

NEW YORK — Police have arrested three women from Texas who are accused of attacking a hostess in Manhattan when they were asked to show proof of their COVID-19 vaccinations Thursday.

The NYPD says all three women are charged with misdemeanor assault and criminal mischief.

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Why is Rikers Island in a state of emergency?

BY Spectrum News NY1

As the crisis on Rikers Island intensifies, politicians at the state and local level are looking for solutions. NY1’s Zack Fink, Courtney Gross and Juan Manuel Benítez weigh in on the chaotic situation inside the city’s largest jail complex and discuss some of the obstacles blocking reform.

They also talk about the reopening of public schools during the COVID-19 pandemic and the city’s push to get New Yorkers back to the office.

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City’s messaging on vaccine mandates was inconsistent, union head says

BY Patrick Adcroft

NEW YORK — District Council 37 had attempted to compromise with the city over its return-to-work and COVID-19 vaccine mandates before it took legal action over the vaccine order, the union’s executive director said Thursday evening.

Earlier this week, a judge temporarily blocked implementation of the city’s vaccine requirement for Department of Education (DOE) staff members after DC37, one of the city’s largest municipal unions, sued. Unlike other municipal workers, DOE employees cannot test out of the mandate.

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Pandemic exposes cracks in public health infrastructure

BY Erin Billups - National Health Reporter

It's been a year and a half since the coronavirus pandemic rocked the country’s public health infrastructure to its core, and while more robust than most, weaknesses in the city’s health system were also exposed. Though city officials remain hopeful after learning Wednesday that FEMA will now be reimbursing the city's hospitals for COVID-related costs.

During the first surge of the pandemic, the USNS Comfort was docked in the Hudson treating a few dozen patients. Similarly at the Billie Jean King Tennis Center in Queens, nurses reportedly sat idle. Workers at both facilities were waiting to offer emergency aid. Those additional resources went underused, experts say, because the city’s health care system is fragmented. Navigating logistics between existing public and private hospitals proved hard enough.

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Some parents won't take 'no remote option' for an answer

BY Jillian Jorgensen

When students streamed into public schools on Monday morning, Tajh Sutton’s two children weren’t among them.

“It's not that I don't want to send my kids to school — I would love nothing more for them to reunite with their teachers and and their peers, you know. But I'm not gonna risk their health for them to do that,” Sutton said.

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COVID-19 outbreak linked to Electric Zoo festival, health officials say

BY Spectrum News Staff

NEW YORK — A COVID-19 outbreak has been linked to the Electric Zoo music festival, according to the city.

The city health department announced Wednesday that it was investigating a cluster of at least 16 cases linked to the Randall's Island festival, which was held over Labor Day weekend.

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Broadway is back with reopening of ‘The Lion King,’ ‘Hamilton,’ other blockbuster shows

BY Stephanie Simon

NEW YORK — "Hamilton," "Chicago," "The Lion King" and "Wicked" reopened to rousing applause Tuesday night — cheers not just for the performances, but also for the moment, signifying Broadway is back

Wait for it…the crowd was already erupting in applause at the sound of “ladies and gentlemen” but then when Kristin Chenoweth was announced —-just listen! Wow 🤩🤩chills!!! And lots of tears from audience @NY1 pic.twitter.com/qLJhlx4Y0Q

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‘On Stage Presents: Broadway’s Revival’: Sara Bareilles talks ‘Waitress,’ honoring Nick Cordero

BY Spectrum News NY1

NEW YORK — In the NY1 special, “On Stage Presents: Broadway’s Revival,” Frank DiLella sits down with singer-songwriter Sara Bareilles, who not only wrote the music and lyrics for the musical “Waitress,” but is starring in the latest run on Broadway. She also discusses how the show is honoring Nick Cordero, who died of COVID-19.

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‘On Stage Presents: Broadway’s Revival’: Jesse Tyler Ferguson, Danny Burstein on the emotions of coming back

BY Spectrum News NY1

NEW YORK — In the NY1 special, “On Stage Presents: Broadway’s Revival,” Frank DiLella catches up with “Modern Family” star Jesse Tyler Ferguson about his opening night plans, and Danny Burstein, star of “Moulin Rouge! The Musical” currently in rehearsals, about the return of Broadway.

Meanwhile, Rocco Vertuccio sits down with Brandon A. McCall, “The Lion King’s” Simba. Plus we head to Joe Allen, one of the Theater District’s most famous restaurants, to learn about how they weathered the pandemic induced shutdown.

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‘On Stage Presents: Broadway’s Revival’: Lin-Manuel Miranda on far-reaching impacts of Broadway’s return

BY Spectrum News NY1

NEW YORK — In the NY1 special, “On Stage Presents: Broadway’s Revival,” Lin-Manuel Miranda stops by the Majestic Theatre to chat with Frank DiLella about the far-reaching impacts of Broadway’s return, and what he plans to do now that it’s back.

Plus we head to “Hamilton,” where Stephanie Simon has a story about the background heroes of the theater: the ushers.

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‘On Stage Presents: Broadway’s Revival’: Andrea Martin, Playbill and ‘Wicked’ are back

BY Spectrum News NY1

NEW YORK — In the NY1 special, “On Stage Presents: Broadway’s Revival,” Broadway favorite Andrea Martin joins Frank DiLella on stage, we go behind the scenes as Playbill turns on the printing presses once again after being turned off for over a year, and Shannan Ferry gets crowd reaction inside the theater as “Wicked” opens for the first time in a year-and-a-half.

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‘On Stage Presents: Broadway’s Revival’: Hochul sees Broadway mirroring NY’s comeback

BY Spectrum News NY1

NEW YORK — In the NY1 special, “On Stage Presents: Broadway’s Revival,” George Whipple talks with Brian Stokes Mitchell, chairman of the Actor’s Fund, and Stephanie Simon speaks with theater owner James L. Nederlander.

Plus, Gov. Kathy Hochul talks with Frank DiLella about the importance of Broadway as the economic engine and heart and soul of New York City.

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Met Gala returns after pandemic cancellation

BY Associated Press

NEW YORK (AP) — Billie Eilish went full glam in a huge peach ball gown at the pandemic-delayed Met Gala on Monday night, while fellow host of the evening Amanda Gorman was breathtaking in cobalt blue custom Vera Wang with a diamond laurel wreath in her hair.

Rihanna, ever the Met Gala queen, showed up late in a huge black Balenciaga look and hat accompanied by A$ap Rocky in a multicolored quilted number. She wore over 267 carats of Bulgari diamonds, including two choker necklaces.

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'Nervous and excited:' Public schools reopen at full capacity for first time since March 2020

BY Jillian Jorgensen and Spectrum News Staff
UPDATED 7:38 PM ET Sep. 13, 2021

NEW YORK — With a countdown and confetti, Mayor Bill de Blasio and Schools Chancellor Meisha Porter on Monday rang in the start of a new school year in the Bronx — the first full reopening of the city’s school system with no remote option since March of 2020.

“It’s so good to see all our kids coming back to school, in person, where they can learn best, where they can see with their friends, where they can be with the teachers and the staffers who care for them,” de Blasio said.

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How New York City is expanding its life sciences industry

BY Juan Manuel Benitez

NEW YORK — If you’ve ever taken a COVID-19 test in New York City, it’s highly likely your sample was processed by one of the machines at the Pandemic Response Lab.

Since last September, Opentrons, a company that builds robots for biologists, has been processing COVID-19 tests for the New York City Health + Hospitals system.

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Your guide to the coronavirus variants, from alpha to mu

BY Maddie Burakoff
UPDATED 2:52 PM ET Sep. 13, 2021

MILWAUKEE — A year and a half into the COVID-19 pandemic, the world looks a lot different than it used to. And so does the coronavirus itself.

As it’s infected hundreds of millions of people around the globe, the SARS-CoV-2 virus has been in a state of constant change, making small tweaks to its genetic code as it goes along.

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Proof of vaccination enforcement begins at these NYC businesses

BY Alyssa Paolicelli
UPDATED 11:54 AM ET Sep. 13, 2021

NEW YORK — City inspectors are now on the prowl to make sure indoor businesses are asking for proof of at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine for patrons 12 and over.

They include indoor dining, entertainment and fitness centers.

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Protesters demand city offer remote learning and telework options

BY Victoria Manna

Jennifer Goddard’s son, 10-year-old August Huete, has asthma. Because he is not eligible to get vaccinated against COVID-19 she’s afraid of sending him to school Monday with no remote option.

“I will not let him go into a school building that is overcrowded, to take his mask off during cafeteria lunch. None of that is going to happen to my child,” said Goddard.

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‘Come From Away’ film and Broadway reopening bookend 9/11 anniversary

BY Frank DiLella

NEW YORK — As the world stops to remember the 20th anniversary of 9/11, “On Stage” Host Frank DiLella takes us through five years of coverage of the "9/12 musical" "Come From Away," from its out-of-town tryout in Washington D.C. in 2016, to its Broadway debut the following year, to its new streaming home on Apple TV+, and finally to its triumphant reopening on Broadway.

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Arbitrator OKs some COVID-19 vaccine mandate exemptions for NYC public school teachers

BY Spectrum News Staff

NEW YORK — A resolution between the city and the union for public school teachers will grant new options for educators who are not vaccinated against COVID-19.

An independent arbitrator announced late Friday that teachers with specific documented medical or religious exemptions must be offered alternative work assignments. The arbitrator also said remote work must be available for vaccinated teachers with suppressed immune systems.

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Vaccines required for NYC public school children participating in extracurricular activities

BY Ari Ephraim Feldman

New York City public school students ages 12 and up will be required to get vaccinated in order to participate in certain performing arts programs, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Friday.

The new mandate comes weeks after the city said students playing contact sports would be required to be vaccinated, and includes chorus, musical theater, dance, band and cheerleading, among other activities. The requirement goes into effect immediately, de Blasio said.

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Small landlords worry ongoing eviction moratoriums will spell financial doom

BY Lori Chung

NEW YORK — As a transit worker, Cynthia Brooks says she saved for years to buy and renovate a four family building in Brownsville but now, with the latest extension of the eviction moratorium, she’s scared she’ll lose it.

“Where’s this money coming from? Where? Tell me where it is?" asked Brooks, in frustration.

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A doctor caught the delta variant. Things got worse when it spread to her young children.

BY Jillian Jorgensen

NEW YORK — Dr. Diana Kirke is an ear, nose, and throat surgeon at Mount Sinai. As someone whose job involves checking out people’s airways, she takes coronavirus protections seriously.

“We hand wash all the time, we wear protective equipment,” Kirke said. “We shower when we get home at the end of the day, we don't wear the same clothes in the house that we wear to work.”

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City expands vaccine mandate to contracted child care staff

BY Ari Ephraim Feldman

Child care workers contracted with the city for programs such as pre-K, 3-K and after-school education will be required to receive at least one vaccine dose before Sept. 27, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced at a Thursday news conference.

The mandate expands an existing vaccination requirement for all city education department staff, which also goes into effect Sept. 27.

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'Waitress' and 'Hadestown' first musicals to reopen on Broadway since COVID shutdown

BY Frank DiLella

NEW YORK — The diner is officially open for business! The hit show "Waitress" returned to Broadway on Thursday night, marking the first of two musicals to play on the Great White Way since the COVID-19 induced shutdown.

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer – who was responsible for helping Broadway get back up and running with the passage of the Shuttered Venue Operators Grant – was on hand to lend his support.

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Teachers' union and city spar over vaccine exemptions

BY Jillian Jorgensen

The city’s teachers' union says it’s at an impasse with Mayor Bill de Blasio’s administration over one aspect of the mayor’s school staff vaccine mandate: What happens to teachers who have a medical reason they can’t get the shot?

On Thursday, the United Federation of Teachers filed a request with the state’s Public Employment Relations Board, asking them to mediate the dispute.

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State legislature expected to call special session to address eviction moratorium

BY Gloria Pazmino

Albany lawmakers are expected to be called in for a special session this week to extend an eviction moratorium, giving tenants at risk a glimmer of hope even as the state struggles to distribute millions of dollars in federal rent relief funds.

State Sen. Gustavo Rivera, a member of the Senate's Housing, Construction and Community Development Committee, said lawmakers are likely to be back in the capitol before the week is over.

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J’Ouvert celebration canceled again this year, mayor says

BY Anna Lucente Sterling

J’Ouvert, the daybreak event usually marking the start of Caribbean Carnival in Brooklyn, has been canceled for the second time in a row due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, Mayor Bill de Blasio said.

At a news conference on Monday, the mayor called the celebration “one that is so important to so many New Yorkers, but that this year cannot happen the way it did pre-pandemic, [and] has been postponed again until 2022.”

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NY tenants are at risk of eviction after 2 Supreme Court rulings. Here's what they can do.

BY Bobby Cuza

For the first time since March of 2020, widespread eviction proceedings can now move forward in New York, thanks to a pair of Supreme Court rulings that have invalidated state and federal eviction moratoriums in the past two weeks.

“Right now, there is no eviction moratorium in place for any tenants in New York at all,” said Cea Weaver, campaign coordinator for the advocacy group Housing Justice for All.

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Supreme Court blocks Biden ban, allows evictions to resume during pandemic

BY Associated Press and Spectrum News Staff
UPDATED 10:40 PM ET Aug. 26, 2021

The Supreme Court's conservative majority is allowing evictions to resume across the United States, blocking the Biden administration from enforcing a temporary ban that was put in place because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Roughly 3.5 million people in the United States said they faced eviction in the next two months, according to Census Bureau data from early August.

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Protesters outside City Hall slam COVID-19 vaccine requirement

BY Dan Rivoli

Mary and Angela Salomone are sisters from Queens who work in public schools in Brooklyn. On Wednesday, they attended a rally in protest of the city’s new COVID-19 vaccine mandate for teachers and school staff.

“I was very, very depressed because I don’t have any intention of getting the vaccine,” Mary Salomone said.

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0.33% of vaccinated New Yorkers have gotten COVID-19 since January: City data

BY Ari Ephraim Feldman

A new analysis of COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations and deaths from the city health department shows strong effectiveness of the vaccines in preventing serious illness and death, even as the highly infectious delta variant has surged over the summer.

The analysis found that between January and the first week of August, 96.9% of people hospitalized due to COVID-19 were unvaccinated, and just 0.33% of vaccinated New Yorkers have tested positive for COVID-19.

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Tenants rally for NY to speed up emergency rental relief distribution

BY Clodagh McGowan

NEW YORK — Police arrested more than a dozen protesters blocking traffic and not listening to police in Brooklyn on Thursday after acts of civil disobedience to call attention to what demonstrators see as the state’s failure.

“I’m behind in rent,” said John Mudd, who lives in Midtown South. “My neighbor across the hall is behind in rent.”

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80,000 New Yorkers have gotten $100 for vaccination

BY Ari Ephraim Feldman

More than 80,000 New Yorkers have received their first COVID-19 vaccine in exchange for a $100 gift certificate from the city, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced at a Thursday news conference.

That represents $8 million given directly to individuals who received their immunization from city-run clinics.

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TELL NY1 YOUR CORONAVIRUS STORY,
IN YOUR OWN VOICE

Tens of thousands of New Yorkers have fallen sick from the coronavirus and the death toll keeps rising. Jobs have been lost, storefronts shuttered, hospitals overwhelmed. And many New Yorkers have seen their own lives changed in deeply personal ways.

NY1 wants to hear your story, in your own voice, to use in a future podcast. 

Tell us what is going on in your family, your job, your neighborhood. What are your daily struggles and your daily joys, your quiet fears and your hopes for the future?

Send us a voicemail, voice memo, or a video to YOURSTORYNY1@CHARTER.COM or leave a message at 212-379-3440. 

Make sure to tell us your first name and your neighborhood. If you’d like, let us know how to contact you. 

Symptoms

The 2019 novel coronavirus may cause mild to severe respiratory symptoms like:

  • cough
  • fever
  • trouble breathing and
  • pneumonia

The CDC believes symptoms may appear in as few as 2 days or as long as 14 days after exposure to the virus.

(Source: NYS DOH)

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