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House Holds 40th Symbolic Vote To Repeal Health Care Reform

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Before leaving for a five-week recess, the Republican-controlled House of Representatives voted for the 40th time Friday to repeal the Affordable Care Act, leaving behind more than their share of critical business. NY1's Michael Scotto filed the following Report.

Though Republicans have a hard time agreeing on anything these days, repealing the Affordable Care Act brings the Grand Old Party together like nothing else.

"We don't believe in omnibus Washington-engineered health care," said Republican Majority Leader Eric Cantor. "That's what's going on here, Washington bureaucrats deciding what kind of health care you can have."

On Friday, the House attempted for the 40th time to repeal or scale back Obamacare.

This latest bill would prohibit the IRS from implementing the law, a move that would effectively kill health care reform.

The bill got the support of 228 Republicans and just four Democrats, including North Carolina's Mike McIntyre.

"This bill speaks for the American people, and they say, 'Don't let the IRS get their hands on our health care,'" said Rep. John Carter, a Republican from Texas. "They will destroy us."

The bill has no shot at becoming law, and Democrats charge it's just a way to distract from Washington's dysfunction.

"This obsession must end," said Rep. Nydia Velazquez, a Democrat who represents parts of Brooklyn, Manhattan and Queens. "It is time to move on and start tackling the challenges the American people care about: jobs, jobs, jobs, the economy."

Lawmakers are at odds over major policy initiatives, spending bills are at a standstill, the farm bill is still a mess, and immigration reform has no clear path forward.

"I think largely, it has been a dysfunctionality of the Republican caucus itself, of its ability to actually pass legislation," said Rep. Joseph Crowley, a Democrat who represents parts of Queens and the Bronx.

In fact, just 22 bills passed by Congress this year have been signed into law by the president.

Lawmakers are now on recess for five weeks. When they return, they will have just nine legislative days to prevent a government shutdown. Based on how things are going now, it is likely that that fight will come down to the wire.

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