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Decision 2012: Presidential Candidates Return To Campaign Trail After Debate

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President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney were back out on the campaign trail Wednesday, a day after their second presidential debate.

President Obama met with college students at a Ohio University rally Wednesday evening.

He said he kept his promises to the country and will continue to do so.

"Four years ago, I promised I'd end the war in Iraq and I did," Obama said. "I said we'd end the war in Afghanistan and we are. I said we'd refocus on the terrorists who actually attacked us on 9/11 and bin Laden is dead."

Meanwhile, Mitt Romney held a town hall meeting in Leesburg, Virginia.

He told senior voters the world is a dangerous place and the country needs both leadership and a strong military.

"We don't know what kind of threats we're going to face down the road," Romney said. "But this I can tell you: unlike cutting the military, as this president would do by $1 trillion, I will instead maintain our military strength because America's military must be second to none and so strong, no one would ever test us. "

Both candidates are focusing on battleground states as the election nears.

Earlier in the day, the president visited Iowa, while Romney made another stop in Virginia.

Both candidates will be back in the city again Thursday for an annual white-tie roast.

They'll be the keynote speakers at the 67th Annual Alfred E. Smith Memorial Foundation Dinner at the Waldorf-Astoria.

President Obama also spoke at the dinner back in 2008, as did Sen. John McCain, his opponent at the time.

The dinner gives candidates a chance to loosen up with the election just a few weeks away.

The Archdiocese of New York runs the event, which raises millions for charity.

Commuters can expect traffic in Midtown during the Thursday evening rush.

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