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Sandy One Year Later: Baby Born At Height Of Storm Celebrates First Birthday

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TWC News: Sandy One Year Later: Baby Born At Height Of Storm Celebrates First Birthday
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Sandy knocking out power to NYU Langone Medical Center did not keep one baby boy from making his entrance into the world. NY1's Lindsey Christ filed the following report.

Stone Weinstock was about an hour old when he went on his first trip: A ride uptown, courtesy of some nice men from Ohio, with flashing lights and a siren. He had been born by the light of neon glow sticks and iPhone flashlights in the middle of Hurricane Sandy, after NYU Langone Medical Center lost power and back-up power.

"We do do a lot of simulation training here at our medical center but we've never actually practiced what you would do if the lights went out," said Dr. William Schweitzer.

And they hadn't expected them to go out that night.

"I remember the hospital administrators coming in and telling us we were in the best place possible because they had back-up power for weeks," said Tamar Weinstock, Stone's mother.

But then, storm surge poured more than 14 feet of water into the basement, shutting down the fuel tanks for the generators.

"We were all quite shocked," Dr. Schweitzer said.

"All the lights went out, the generators went out, the machines went out. And that's when we kind of looked at each other and were like, 'Okay, what's happening here,'" Weinstock said.

Several women were in labor, and doctors decided most had time to be evacuated to another hospital before delivering. But for Weinstock and two others, there was a different plan.

"We're gonna have your baby in the dark and, you know, women have been doing this for millions of years and well you'll have no trouble," Dr. Schweitzer recalled.

At 10:39 p.m. Stone was born. Meanwhile, the hospital was in the midst of evacuating all 300 patients, including 20 babies from the intensive care unit.

"I got to hold Stone for a few minutes and kind of bond with him initially but it felt quick... that they said, 'Okay we have to go,'" Weinstock said.

Weinstock was loaded onto a medical sled, carried down nine flights and put on an ambulance bound for Mt. Sinai.

Ultimately, all of the patients were safely transferred. And while Stone went through his first year of life NYU says it has made changes ranging from major renovations to simply stocking more flashlights.

Now Stone will celebrate his turning 1-year-old twice with a party hosted by NYU and another at home, where guests will find glow sticks in their goody bags.

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