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End In Sight For Second Ave. Muck Houses

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Workers and a crane have begun taking apart the tallest of the Second Avenue Subway muck houses, all to the delight of local residents and businesses living near the Second Avenue Subway construction site. NY1's Jose Martinez filed the following report.

The ugliest house on the block will soon be no more. Erected to collect muck from underground construction of the Second Avenue Subway, the unsightly tower at 72nd Street is being dismantled by crews over the next several weeks.

And that's finally bringing residents and shopkeepers at the corner out of the shadows.

"Thrilled. Especially for the people who live in the first few floors and have had no light for the last months, years," said one Upper East Side resident.

The so-called muck house was constructed in April of 2011. It was designed to cut down on noise and dust from construction. It's the first of four such towers along Second Avenue to start coming down along the construction path of the new line, whose first phase will stretch from 96th to 63rd Street.

"The blasting is done, we're no longer removing any muck. So therefore all our work is contained down underground, so this muck house has outlived its usefulness," said MTA Capital Construction President Michael Horodniceanu.

At nearly five stories tall and made up of 120 metal panels, the muck house at 72nd Street is the tallest of the four towers that have gone up along Second Avenue.

The muck house at 69th Street will come down in the fall, while MTA officials say those at 83rd and 86th Streets should be gone next year.

Good riddance, say those who've tried to keep making a living behind the block-long structure.

"I feel worse for the merchants on Second Avenue. I think it's hurt, I've seen some people go out of business because of these," said one Upper East Side resident.

"Everything is down. Too much dust, too much blasting," said one Upper East Side merchant.

There's still a long way to go until the Second Avenue subway is running. The $4.5 billion project is scheduled to be completed by December 2016, more than seven years after the start of construction.

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