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DOE Requiring 127 Students to Re-Take US History Regents After Their Exams Were Lost

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TWC News: DOE Requiring 127 Students to Re-Take US History Regents After Their Exams Were Lost
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The Department of Education lost 127 students' US History Regents exams before they could be graded and is now requiring these students re-take the test. NY1's Lindsey Christ filed the following report.

Nevaeh Rudder has unexpectedly spent her summer studying for a test she already took.

"We learned everything over the year's span, so from September to June," she said. "And now, after June was let out, that last day of school, I let everything go out of my head. I didn't have to worry, had no summer school, and I'm just going to relax. "

But on July 17, her parents got a letter from the Department of Education.

"Your child's U.S. History and Government Exam cannot be located at this time," Nevaeh said, reading from the letter.

The DOE blamed a private courier service for losing the exams on their way to being graded at another site.

This is not the first time this has happened. Two years ago, the city began phasing in a new policy that forbids schools from grading their own students' Regents exams, and immediately, tests began to be lost in transit.

In 2012, 17 students in Brooklyn were forced to retake the U.S. History exam. Last year, 75 students in Manhattan had to retake the English test. But this year's screw-up is the worst to-date, with 127 students in Queens now required to retake the history test.

Nevaeh will be a senior at Thomas Edison Career and Technical High School, one of four schools in Jamaica where tests were lost.

"I worked very hard in junior year, and then, to find out that I wouldn't even know the grade I got and I would have to work in my summer basically made me feel like I was being punished," she said.

Other students are even worse off. Of the 127, 13 were seniors, and for eight, passing the U.S. History exam is the only thing keeping them from a diploma.

The students started a Facebook page asking the DOE to excuse them from the requirement, but city officials said their hands are tied since the test is a state requirement.

"I just would like them to excuse us because it's not our fault," Nevaeh said. "We did our part. We studied. The school prepared us. We worked hard. So it's not our fault."

On Thursday, Nevaeh will take the test again. However, NY1 has spoken with other students who are out of town and will have to keep studying until January, their next chance to retake the test.

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