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The Call Blog: Lawmakers Applaud Street Stop Ruling, Call For More NYPD Reforms

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Any department, especially one that carries as much power as the police department, should be subject to oversight. The question here is how much; is it enough to just have the Mayor oversee policies or do we need an outside voice, or two? While I do think that two monitors may be a bit much, the complete killing of the Community Safety Act is unwise as well, since it has so many other measures built in.



One day after a federal judge ruled the NYPD's use of Stop, Question and Frisk discriminated based on race, several members of the City Council took to the steps of City Hall to praise the decision. The lawmakers also called on the Council to override Mayor Bloomberg's veto of bills to create an Inspector General to oversee the Police Department and to ban "discriminatory police profiling."

Those who support additional police reforms cite "the failure of the Bloomberg administration to remedy its unconstitutional policies." Opponents counter that the NYPD is already the most regulated and scrutinized police force in the country. What do you say?

Should the City Council override Mayor Bloomberg's veto of the Community Safety Act? Does the NYPD need an independent monitor to change Stop and Frisk, as well as an independent Inspector General to recommend policy changes? What will be Mayor Bloomberg's legacy when it comes to fighting crime?

Send your thoughts using the link above.



Just the words stop and frisk turn my stomach! Most people for stop and frisk.haven't been frisked for no reason at all.this program wouldn't last 10mins on 5 th ave nyc.

Joe
Brooklyn



Truth of three matter is only 30% of the unwarranted and resultless stops are never reported and aren't represented in the stats. This is a constitutional matter. All Americans have the right to be protected from these warrantless stops. Police in ny feel they have they right to search any pockets or cars with impunity.



To that judge who wants to stop and frisk...

I'm with Bloomberg on this one...If we end "Stop and Frisk", it will be open season for the criminals...If one has NOTHING to hide, then what's the problem.??

On the other hand, we will be giving the thugs and criminal free leeway to do whatever the heck they want...Being hispanic myself, I know for a fact that we are NOT ALL stopped...

N.Y. will be more dangerous than ever if this order goes through and that would be a damn shame....

M. Sandoval



I don't understand why the mayor is bend out of shape about the judge's decision to rein in the abuses of stop and frisk as currently implemented, her sound opinion and suggestions will enhance the stop and frisk program by making it more just, which will generate greater support in minority communities.

Felix
Bay Ridge



The return to Constitutional law has been a long time coming. Bloomberg is responsible for more violations of our rights and freedom than any of his predecessors. The sooner he's out of office, the better we will all be.

Joe
Port Richmond



This matter about stop and frisk should have been settled with the new
mayor. This is just going to hang on like an albatross around our necks
because Bloomberg wants to keep it and this will never end until he
exits.

Plus we once again have to listen to his sarcastic remarks and
he continues to talk to us so mean spirited. It should have been put on
the back burner.

I would like to see his paper work of the NYPD that he has fudged for
o so many years. NYPD can only do what their superiors tell them to
do. I dislike his stats on all topics. They are just made up to look good
to the public.

Most of these so called politicians have been around for so many years
and they want to try to please people at the end of their run. Nothing
will change if we vote for the same people again.
AS FAR AS I’M CONCERNED HE HAS NO LEGACY = ONE A SCORE FROM
1 TO 10 = I SAY IT’S OFF THE CHART AND I GIVE IT A [ ZERO]

Maxxiee
Morris Park



The city council should override Bloomberg's veto of the CSA the NYPD do need a independent monitor to change its tatics of stop and frisk because to many minorities are being stopped for no reson and that's racism. A I.G should be in place to recommend the right policy changes Bloomberg's legacy is he tried but failed when it comes to fighting crime

Herman
Upper New York



The mayor is appealing the ruling, which automatically stays its effects -- as to what the so-called minority leadership is clamoring for, I'm beginning to think that, in the event that the mayor should lose the appeal, we should give them what they want.

And that, in effect, will be what Daniel Patrick Moynihan referred to during his time serving President Nixon as "benign neglect." Leave them to their own devices to deal with crime, until the body count forces an uprising or a reappraisal.

You can only go on so long trying to make people listen, who won't -- and then it's time to let them stew in the pot they've put themselves in.

And those of us who can (including yours truly) will simply leave, with our money and our resources, and New York can become another Detroit, or Newark, jumbo-size.

Bruce
Upper West Side



I have no faith in the City Council led by Christine Quinn. They are getting complacent under the guise of race. I will not be supporting any of them who supports the "Discriminatory Racial Profiling" bill. They along with the judge are playing the race card in the year 2013. They are relics in the modern world.

Roscoe
Park Hill



I say let the police do their job. I lived in NY all my life and feel more safe now under the Bloomberg Administration than all the previous administrations.
You may not like what the police are doing but I feel safer. When it gets out of hand, meaning that the statistics do not support the act then we must change.
What the judge did was in my opinion a crime against the neighborhoods that have little financial and political power.

Although the "Stop and Frisk" is not favored some should meditate on the following.
1. The Judge making the ruling makes decent money and more than likely do not live in a high crime area. (Probably a little or no stop and frisk in her community) 2. The lawyers pushing the anti -stop and frisk make decent money and more than likely do not live in a high crime area. (Probably a little or no stop and frisk in their communities) 3. The Politicians and activist who are anti-stop and frisk and who make decent money and more than likely do not live in a high crime area.
(Probably a little or no stop and frisk in their communities).
4. Did we look at the statistics and how poor communities benefited?
5. In my opinion the poor people living in high crime areas will suffer.
They will have to report the drug dealers and their location, the thieves and their locations, the murderers and their location to get the police to act. When they do and the drug money gets the high powered lawyer and they request freedom for information about who informed the police what do you think will happen? No more witness. No more complaints. They do not have the money and political connections to fight or protect themselves legally.

Damond



This decision that was made by the judge in the case, is nothing more than taking away the right of the police to do their job of making arrests. So those who are applauding this decision, when an incident in their communities that escalates into violence get out control and there are shootouts and people shot and the police are called and make no arrests, except when innocent bystanders and passersby, get hurt in the cross-fire, shouldn't complain if the police don't or won't do anything to stop the violence. They(the police) will say, that if they so as much make arrests, they'll be accused of racial profiling and will not take that risk. How would those that asked for the end of stop and frisk feel then!?

Cecilia
East Williamsburg



Federal Judge Shira Scheindlin, ruled that the city's policy," of Stop and Frisk," is racial discrimination and unconstitutional . Well I believe like Mayor Bloomberg that to stop this policy will make us all unsafe. Furthermore I would like to applaud NYPD and its finest under Police Commissioner Ray Kelly for keeping us safe. But there are those who wish to handcuff our diligent police officers from doing their job by taking away a vital tool, which is, the policy of," Stop and Frisk." which saves lives. As Mayor Mike Bloomberg has stated which is that the Supreme Court has found this policy constitutional. It has taken 8,000 guns off the street over the past decade and some 80,000 other weapons. Our Mayor Bloomberg also pointed out that as recently as 1990 the City of New York had more than six murders a day. Now we have an average of one per day. If murder rates had stayed the same in a period of 11 years more than 7,300 who are alive today would not be alive. The policy under Mayor Bloomberg and Commissioner Kelly have worked and have saved lives. Now as far as Judge Scheindlin accusations that the policy is racist, let me point out that many of our police officers are from minority groups themselves and 97 percent of shooting victims are also black and Hispanic. I believe with a change in policy more young innocent children will be killed. In the end I feel more guns will enter our communities and the criminals will rule our streets. When that happens I feel those who can will sell their homes and move out of New York for a safer place to live. Now that in my opinion will be a sad day indeed when the middle class moves out.

Frederick
Glen Oaks



Not apropos of your show, but we've ha more crime in the last two months than in the last six years. Nevermind the past two weeks. Do you know anything we don't??

We'd love some answers...

Dana



Pat Lynch joins mayor Bloomberg and Commissioner Kelly in not facing the mistreatment of minorities. We have crime rate with 6,000 less officers. All Lynch care about is getting more dues paying cops. Where was he when peoples rights were being destroyed by rookie untrained cops.

Allan
Midwood



I'd like to see every cop feel what it's like to be stopped and frisked, and not in some mamby pamby academy exercise. No, find them walking on the street, preferably with friends and family, pounce on them, yell at them, slam them against a wall or a car, treat them like a criminal, appear angry and mean that no crime was discovered, and give no explanation for any of it. THAT will teach them what they're doing to people.

Jordan
Flushing



I was a civilian for NYPD for 30 years. I made a CCRB compliant against my Lt. CCRB told me he didn’t work for NYPD & closed my case!! The system doesn’t work now! A new independent system needs to be put in place!!

Crystal
Brooklyn



I wholeheartedly agree with what he said. I want to know where was he for the past 8 years. But to his point this ruling is a shame the judge should have shut the policy down. Who pays for these cumbersome cameras that the police will have to wear?. The taxpayers that cannot even get a new school built has to fund this pilot program and all the other pilot programs Bloomberg has done. We need more police officers on the street and for them to patrol a neighborhood and get to know who is who and not broad sweep the neighborhood. Too bad Lynch couldn't be the next commissioner.

Lorraine
Williamsburg



There needs to be harmony between the NYPD and the communities they police. This goes beyond stop, question and frisk. This SHOULD NOT be the NYPD against civilians or vice versa. We need to work together to fight crime together as a progressive community. The only opposition are the criminals. There must be more community/police precinct events to form a solid bond. In the meantime attend police community board meetings, meet the officers patrolling your area and give your input. It's important to fulfill your part in combating crime in our own neighborhoods.

Mosby
Bedford-Stuyvesant



Yes the council show override the mayor. Bloomberg and Kelly say its enough oversight but interal affairs are actually police policing police they only look out for one another

Deshawn
Brooklyn



The mayor’s off his meds again. Anyway, if the police aren’t doing anything wrong, what are they afraid of?

Jayne
East Harlem



Yes, the council should override the veto and yes the NYPD needs an independent monitor and Inspector General. When bloomberg said on his radio show that the police should stop more blacks and less whites he made it abundantly clear what his legacy will be when it comes to crime - he's racist and stop and frisk was criminal and unconstitutional. I can't wait until I don't have to hear his petulant, whiny arrogant voice again. Maybe I'll have a party!

meryl
manhattan



over sight is needed as well as body cams that cannot be turned off by officers..especially the narcotics division..they are the worst out..training day the movie best describes how they operate..they bend the law to make arrests.

Eric
Queens



people always keep spouting numbers and stats in support of stop and frisks, but ignore the same numbers that show that the majority of those minorities stopped and frisked yield little more than people who possess small bags of marijuana and or results in nothing more than a summons being issued.

Frank



Anything PBA President Pat Lynch has to say about Stop-and-Frisk should be taken with a mountain of salt, as he's never met a cop who's done anything wrong. Not the cops who killed Amadou Diallo, not the cops who killed Sean Bell, and certainly none of the cops who stopped "at least 200,000" people without reasonable suspicion, according to Judge Scheindlin's ruling yesterday. Lynch, Mayor Bloomberg, and Commissioner Kelly can whine all they want about having to submit the NYPD to adult supervision, but every time they squawk, and fuss, and pop a vein in public, they give more and more reasons why outside monitoring is necessary, because they obviously can't be trusted to make our police abide by the Constitution on their own. Yes to a federal monitor, and yes to an Inspector General. Both are probably long overdue.

Chris
Lower East Side



How ironic that Patrick Lynch decided to speak out about what a great relationship the NYPD has within the community. Patrick Lynch has been the champion for every cop that shot and killed an innocent, unarmed minority person going back to the Giuliani years including infamous strangling death of a Puerto Rican young man in the Bronx by a NY City Cop. I do not hate cops and for the most part respect them, but to hear Patrick Lynch speak about good relations between cops and minorities with his track record turns my stomach.

Don
Queens



Both the inspector general bill and the Community Safety Act need to become law. The police have been out of control for years. We need every check on the NYPD that we can get. Another reform we need is a new mayor... one that will not just reform stock and frisk.. but end it!

Steven
Astoria



The unspoken solution to monitoring police is to have every cop audio-visually record their tour of duty.

The technology now exists, small enough and cheap enough to do the job. It will pay for itself quickly with fewer lawsuits, more community trust of police, and result in a safer city in the long run. It will allow senior supervision to link in to a real time event, offering direction in ways never before possible.

Why won't anybody talk about it? The police don't want it, nor do politicians and the wealthy, who expect referential treatment from cops.

Police officers who do their job with pride, respect and diligence may welcome the attention. Others may not. But it only real the solution.

Steven
Upper East Side



Time will tell if the judgment was right. Two concerns I have is that the police officers will need to second guess themselves every single time which could be a matter of life and death. Second, and the bigger problem is the people that simply hate the police and teach their kids to do the same.

In my experience, most cops are good just doing their jobs. There's no need to hate all of them because of few bad apples.

Sean
Flushing



these people who are in support of stop and frisk, who say that all hell will break loose are the same people who have never been stopped and frisked and from the sound of their comments can be construed as being racist, so let me get this straight your argument is that all minorities are potential criminals and deserve to have their constitutional rights violated? hmmm sounds great when you're not the one having your groin area groped in front of your friends, your spouse, your neighbors.



Just like the cabaret and the Rockefeller Drug laws, stop and frisk is open racism/classism made law. It's one thing if it was fair.If you frisked every third hipster on Bedford avenue in Williamsburg any Saturday night and think you wouldn't get a slew of drug possession charges your kidding yourselves. But that would never happen because those people would sue the pants off the NYPD and even if guilty they'd get off.

Spiro
North Brooklyn



How about we put in an inspector general to oversee the NYCHA police and find out why nearly half of serious crime emanates from city housing projects? Any objections ?

Steve
Forest Hills



Not all cops are bad , some of them are good .One reason people are afraid of the NYPD is because alot of cops beat up and kill innocent people and they get away with it.



You'll be sorry.

What are people going to do when their families get murdered?

White people get stopped too. They think cops are doing their jobs.

You are only segregating yourselves and going after cops who want to save lives.

The criminals have no rules.

The anti stop and frisk people don't care. They accuse all police action as unlawful. They even accuse cops of murder when cops shoot a man with a gun.

Philip
Rockaway Park



For the viewers that suggest minority groups are advocating a return to the previous elevated levels of crime I ask you this.....how many times have you or your father or brother been stopped and handled like a criminal for simply walking home/to the store/ train station?

Thomas
South Jamaica



The most potent thing from Judge Sheinlin's ruling is this, in summary:

You cannot stop disproportionate amounts of black and hispanic people because of statistics stating black and hispanic people are responsible for a greater proportion of crimes. Doing so is inherently unjust. Each case has to be considered individually. Just as turbans do not denote terrorism, race does not denote crime.

This needs to be overseen because, unfortunately, some police officers cannot make that distinction.

Chris
Park Slope



Laws and practices exist for a reason . . . "as a result". There have to be parameters and boundaries. We, as an alleged civilization should not expect to be granted permission to run amuck and permitted to do anything that pops into our heads -- and be condoned. Again, if you have nothing to hide you have NOTHING to hide!

Thank You for bringing this to attention.

Carmine
Lower East Side


There is definitely enough oversight of the Nypd. IAB, other internal investigative units, CCRB, the Feds, & the City Council have subpoena powers. Stop, Question & Frisk is an excellent tool. It has been upheld numerous times in the courts. An officer must have Reasonable Suspicion that a crime has been, is or is about to be committed for an officer to forcibly stop someone. In addition, not every stop results in a frisk. Lastly, by percentage, more non-minorities are stopped than minorities. Most crime is committed by minorities so who does one think the police are going to stop?

Dave
Midwood



I am glad that they appointed an independent Monitor because the police officers have taken too many liberties with the lives of minorities. Not every minority are "criminals or are seeking to commit crimes". Let's use some level of civility and intelligence. If the cameras weren't rolling only God knows what these police officers would try to get away with.

Theresa
Upper West Side



I am outraged by John from Bensonhusrt. If he wants to leave New York we'll be happy to tell him goodbye. Who does he think he is that I should be stopped? I live on the upper east side, I work for a top television show here in the city, and I'm not criminal, never been a criminal. The cops, who stopped me, on a Sunday Morning, gave a lame line about someone breaking into businesses. They showed me the picture of a black guy in his twenties, five foot eight, with dread-locks. I am 59 years old, six foot two, and bald. The only reason I was stopped is because I am black. I was profiled. John suggests that I should feel fine with being stopped simply to make him feel safe. Well, enjoy South Carolina, John! Community policing is the way to go. Put extra cops on the streets, in the neighborhoods. If the NYPD were a part of the community they would be more effective.

Glynn



Implementing Marshall law, or the death penalty for petty crime will probably reduce crime too, but is that the world we want to live in? Why is this so difficult for Bloomberg / Kelly to appreciate that results come at a cost?

Evan
East Village

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