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More Than 100 March Against Mistreatment Following Eric Garner's Death

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TWC News: More Than 100 March Against Mistreatment Following Eric Garner's Death
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The police commissioner is promising a review and retraining of the entire NYPD after the death of a Staten Island man during an arrest. A march and rally were held Tuesday night in Tompkinsville. NY1's Michael Herzenberg filed the following report.

More than one hundred people marched from the place police arrested Eric Garner to a nearby police station.

At least one of Garner's family members was among them.

"We came out here to give support and show the family of Eric garner that we feel for them. There was a lot of emotional distress in the crowd," one man at the march said.

People who marched were angry at police and frustrated with how they say officers treat them.

"They have to stop treating people like animals," one woman said.

"It's time for us to speak up and stick together," another said.

Video obtained by the Daily News shows officer Daniel Pantaleo putting Eric Garner in what appears to be a chokehold as police tried to arrest him last week for allegedly selling cigarettes illegally.

Pantaleo and another officer are now on desk duty while Internal Affairs and the Staten Island District Attorney investigate.

"I would not be surprised if the U.S. attorney decides to open a civil rights violation investigation," Police Commissioner William Bratton said Tuesday at a press conference.

The police commissioner says he will conduct a complete review of procedures and police training and then have the entire force retrained.

"...And develop a state-of-the-art training procedure for NYPD officers that allows them to effectively interact—particularly with communities of color in this minority-majority city—in a way in which they build confidence rather than create fear," Bratton said.

"It's absolutely needed. It's necessary. There's no rapport with the community," one woman at the march said.

At the makeshift memorial to Garner, people welcome the news of change to the NYPD, but do so with skepticism.

"I really appreciated his gesture, but what I've seen in my 50 years of life—I've seen a lot of rhetoric, I've heard a lot of rhetoric—but I haven't seen much of a change," another man at the march said.

Many here at the memorial and some elected leaders believe racism played a role in this incident.

The police commissioner says he doesn't think race was involved at all.

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