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Post-Sandy Frustrations Still Exist For Residents Of Red Hook Houses

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TWC News: Post-Sandy Frustrations Still Exist For Residents Of Red Hook Houses
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As the New York City Housing Authority continues to work to aid residents nearly three months after Hurricane Sandy hit, some residents of the Red Hook Houses are still frustrated. NY1's Michael Herzenberg filed the following report.

Temporary boilers still pump heat into some of the buildings at the Red Hook Houses.
Inside the basement of one of the public housing apartment buildings, NY1 found what looks like a makeshift water system for hot water that uses a garbage can as a pump basin.

Residents think the worst.

"I feel like they're treating us like savages," said one resident. "That's water that we use to brush our teeth, water that we use to shower."

The New York City Housing Authority insists this has nothing to do with drinking water, that it's part of the heating system.

Many of the residents of the 32 buildings at the Red Hook Houses lost utilities for the better part of three weeks after Hurricane Sandy.

The hurricane flooded basements and boiler rooms, and contract crews are still working to remediate those areas for the New York City Housing Authority.

"I believe they could've done a lot better than what they did," said one resident. "It's a little slow. The process was slow, really slow, but, you know, what can we do?"

There's no doubt the New York City Housing Authority continues to clean up as well, with no shortage of work. In one place, a downed tree remains still unremoved almost three months after Hurricane Sandy.

"It's, like, really dangerous," said one resident. "There's, like, little kids, they go and play in the grass."

Housing authority crews are reaching out to residents, knocking on doors to hear about complaints and unresolved problems caused by Hurricane Sandy or otherwise.

"The infrastructure was already a little old," said one resident. "We've had problems with leaks and floods and mold."

Once again, the New York City Housing Authority insists the water in the garbage can does not co-mingle with drinking water, which is delivered to residents through a separate system.

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